Water quality park educates the public while maintaining public green space.
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DETAILS

LocationConway, Arkansas United States
ClientCity of Conway Arkansas
Size1.75 acres

The City of Conway received both local and federal grants to create a water quality demonstration park in a flood-prone, one-block area of its downtown to educate the public about Low Impact Development (LID) and Green Infrastructure (GI) methods and how they can enhance water quality. The project will transform this remediated brownfield site, subject to seasonal flooding, into a 300-square-foot urban public space that showcases how LID/GI techniques work with nature to manage rainwater as close to its source as possible, using a variety of measures to slow, filter, infiltrate, and evaporate the runoff in this low-lying area. Markham Square will be artfully engineered to be a unique demonstration of an urban setting functioning in an environmentally responsible way, reducing nonpoint source pollution in the Lake Conway-Point Remove watershed and delivering ecosystem services such as air quality regulation, water regulation, water infiltration, erosion control, nutrient cycling, and recreation. LID/GI methods to be implemented include permeable hardscapes, vegetated living walls, bioswales, and rain gardens. The project will also include workshops, videos, and informational graphics to help educate the public about water quality.

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