A transformational vision bridging connectivity and open space on the L.A. waterfront
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DETAILS

LocationSan Pedro, California, United States
ClientPort of Los Angeles
Size460 acres, 8 linear miles

Spanning over 460 acres and 8 linear miles of waterfront, the Port of Los Angeles is among the most important pieces of infrastructure in the Western Hemisphere—the largest container port in the U.S., a linchpin for global logistics, and an industrial hub critical to San Pedro and L.A. County at large.

Today, the Port is imagining a more connective, accessible, and resilient future waterfront. Building on nearly $234 million in public access investment over the past two decades, the San Pedro Waterfront Connectivity Plan weaves together multiple goals, presenting strategies to enhance connectivity between the San Pedro shoreline, adjacent neighborhoods, and the wider region.

Building on extensive community engagement events including nearly 300 participants, the plan presents a comprehensive set of recommendations spanning vehicular, pedestrian, bicycle, public transit, and water-based mobility across the Port—as well as outlining open space, public art, wayfinding, and recreational opportunities. Direct connections to local climate action policy are woven throughout the plan, positioning the Port to deliver on its long-term sustainability goals in all proposed projects.

Navigating highly complex conditions, the plan brings together fundable, feasible, and resilient strategies to define a cohesive waterfront experience, solve for immediate connectivity issues, and remain adaptive to future use—a framework for a world-class waterfront destination for L.A. and the region.

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