Students

  • WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.
    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.

  • WEEK 2: URBAN DESIGN - RECONFIGURE THE BLOCK

    WEEK 2: URBAN DESIGN - RECONFIGURE THE BLOCK

    One way to create an eco-district is to re-conceptualize and redefine the urban block. The SOMA Super Block, on average 850’ long by 550’ wide, results in very long and deep blocks with minor streets and alleyway subdivisions, and large parcels and buildings. If we reconsider the block as a network rather than individual parcels, the vacant lots, minor streets, alleyways, and roof tops begin to work as a cohesive whole to support the block itself in terms of energy production, waste, recycling, storm water capture and filtration, and open space. This micro scale loop system applied to the district level creates the district itself as a sustainable network.

  • WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - MULTIFUNCTIONAL PERMUTATIONS

    WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - MULTIFUNCTIONAL PERMUTATIONS

    One way to create an eco-district is to re-conceptualize and redefine the urban block. The SOMA Super Block, on average 850’ long by 550’ wide, results in very long and deep blocks with minor streets and alleyway subdivisions, and large parcels and buildings. If we reconsider the block as a network rather than individual parcels, the vacant lots, minor streets, alleyways, and roof tops begin to work as a cohesive whole to support the block itself in terms of energy production, waste, recycling, storm water capture and filtration, and open space. This micro scale loop system applied to the district level creates the district itself as a sustainable network.
    One way to create an eco-district is to re-conceptualize and redefine the urban block. The SOMA Super Block, on average 850’ long by 550’ wide, results in very long and deep blocks with minor streets and alleyway subdivisions, and large parcels and buildings. If we reconsider the block as a network rather than individual parcels, the vacant lots, minor streets, alleyways, and roof tops begin to work as a cohesive whole to support the block itself in terms of energy production, waste, recycling, storm water capture and filtration, and open space. This micro scale loop system applied to the district level creates the district itself as a sustainable network.

  • WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - COLLECTION | CONVEYANCE | CONNECTIVITY

    WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - COLLECTION | CONVEYANCE | CONNECTIVITY

    The current urban form and character of the area has evolved into many layers from civic uses, Victorian buildings, small and large warehouse buildings, and new construction. The I-80 freeway creates a definite strong division north/south. With the introduction of a new mass transit line running along 4th Street, these new stations become activators for new development which help bridge and break this divide.
    Typically, as lands around freeways are the least desirable — this proposal relocates the station to the crux of the problem and transforms this divide into a solution — the new station located at the junction of 4th and I-80 freeway. This would activate lands westward along I-80.

Tina Chee

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“My path towards Landscape Architecture stems from a long standing passion for cities, land art, and the natural environment. After graduating with a Bachelor of Architecture, I lived in Paris, Hong Kong, and London, and have travelled extensively throughout Europe and Asia. As an architect, I have worked on projects that span between urban planning, architecture, and landscape. My interests stem from the visual and tactile arts, and have evolved towards the beauty in the performative.

My current educational pursuits focus on landscape, urbanism, and infrastructure that meld ecological processes and urban programming. I am deeply interested in landscapes that are transformative, multi-purposed experiential and infrastructural networks which regenerate communities as well as fulfill essential environmental services. Upon graduation, I would like to work in the public realm and continue to research contemporary design issues as a designer and educator.”