Students

  • WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.

  • WEEK 02 : URBAN DESIGN - CROSSROADS

    WEEK 02 : URBAN DESIGN - CROSSROADS

    Tim defined an eco-district as a place whose systems are generative — they have the ability to produce or create. After fighting the urge to tackle all the systems involved in a generative district, he zeroed in on its network of roads, the system that best characterized the district.
    SOMA is a crossroads of sorts, hosting a trans-continental Interstate, major state highways, and new rail infrastructure. Its contrast of wide, heavy traffic roads and narrow, slow traffic alleys gives a wide range of experiences and views that are unlike any other in the city.

  • WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - FREEWAY PEAK

    WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - FREEWAY PEAK

    Building on studies from week one and week two, Tim identified a site that was at the intersection of the two new networks of road typologies and could offer a much-needed pedestrian connection point. The Central Corridor has an obvious lack of large-scale green space, so proposing a unique and large park to accompany the network of pedestrian walkways is a vital addition.
    Freeway Peak, a constructed hill, rises between the Interstate interchange at 4th and 5th streets, and offers an iconic entrance and meeting point for the eco-district. The Peak is a unique vantage point above the freeway, offering views across the new green district and to the hills and skyline of San Francisco.

  • WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - GABION PEAK

    WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - GABION PEAK

    Tim’s aim was to produce an element that could be mass-produced, mass-implemented, and had visual and conceptual connection to his notion of eco-district.
    He designed and built an asphalt gabion bench, an element of Freeway Peak. Chunks of asphalt, representative of those from the district’s reclaimed roads, were found in crumbling streets and on construction sites across the city. The mesh was joined by tightly hooking the ends of one around the ends of another, and the wooden slats were embedded in the mesh using double-tipped nails.

Timothy Campbell

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“As a kid, I loved making drip castles on the beach — dripping sand to precarious heights, constructing ad-hoc dams and trenches to protect against incoming tides — inevitably losing this battle and watching my creation be consumed by the sea. This was my first foray into landscape architecture and the genesis of my fascination with the complex and beautiful relationship between built and natural systems. Since these early attempts, I have worked to understand this relationship, which has ultimately led me to landscape architecture.

I received a B.A. in Environmental Studies and after graduating I worked at a public wildflower garden, a National Park, and a small landscape and furniture design firm. These experiences allowed me to interact with natural and social systems at vastly different scales and witness firsthand the ecological and social significance of each scale. I continue to explore how natural, built, and social systems can enhance one another, and am still in pursuit of the perfect drip castle.”