Students

  • WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.
    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.

  • WEEK 02 : URBAN DESIGN - BY FOOT

    WEEK 02 : URBAN DESIGN - BY FOOT

    Katie began the month by researching public space in San Francisco and discovered that although there are a variety of public spaces throughout the city, many of them (particularly privately owned public spaces within office buildings) remain invisible to the public and/or are poorly used. Furthermore, there are only two public spaces within the Central Corridor: Yerba Buena Gardens and South Park. As a result of her research, Katie chose to pursue the expansion of public open space. She proposed closing Third Street (from Market Street to China Basin) to all private vehicular traffic to create a public pedestrian and biking greenway connecting downtown San Francisco to SOMA and the water.
    Katie began the month by researching public space in San Francisco and discovered that although there are a variety of public spaces throughout the city, many of them (particularly privately owned public spaces within office buildings) remain invisible to the public and/or are poorly used. Furthermore, there are only two public spaces within the Central Corridor: Yerba Buena Gardens and South Park. As a result of her research, Katie chose to pursue the expansion of public open space. She proposed closing Third Street (from Market Street to China Basin) to all private vehicular traffic to create a public pedestrian and biking greenway connecting downtown San Francisco to SOMA and the water.

  • WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - BY FOOT

    WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - BY FOOT

    A new pedestrian 3rd Street would contain commercial, residential, recreational, and office space along one thruway terminating at the water. It was vital to the success of the proposal that this unbroken path be punctuated by distinctive places — smaller destinations within the larger mile long walk. In week three, Katie chose four sites along Third Street, at the highway underpass, waterfront, new pedestrian bridge, and streetscape improvements, to examine in greater detail and described the character of each through section and perspective.
    A new pedestrian 3rd Street would contain commercial, residential, recreational, and office space along one thruway terminating at the water. It was vital to the success of the proposal that this unbroken path be punctuated by distinctive places — smaller destinations within the larger mile long walk. In week three, Katie chose four sites along Third Street, at the highway underpass, waterfront, new pedestrian bridge, and streetscape improvements, to examine in greater detail and described the character of each through section and perspective.

  • WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - PAVING DETAIL

    WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - PAVING DETAIL

    Katie was struck by the beautiful patina and the abundance of discarded ceramic roof tiles at both scrap yards the interns visited in week four. She developed four modules including a runnel, a curb, pervious paving, and a wall, that catch and filter water, provide habitat, and may be planted. Each module serves a slightly different function, but each is made of the distinctive roof tile. The placement of the four modules in appropriate locations along Third Street serve to orient visitors and visually connect the corridor.
    Katie was struck by the beautiful patina and the abundance of discarded ceramic roof tiles at both scrap yards the interns visited in week four. She developed four modules including a runnel, a curb, pervious paving, and a wall, that catch and filter water, provide habitat, and may be planted. Each module serves a slightly different function, but each is made of the distinctive roof tile. The placement of the four modules in appropriate locations along Third Street serve to orient visitors and visually connect the corridor.

Katherine Jenkins

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“I grew up in Japan and the UK andgraduated from Yale University with a degree in fine art and anthropology.

Before embarking on my graduate studies in landscape architecture, I taught elementary school art in Connecticut, worked in Yellowstone National Park, and continued to paint and exhibit my artwork. It was, in part, my preoccupation with depicting the landscape through art that drew me to the field of landscape architecture. I have just completed my second year of three at UVA and am looking forward to spending the summer in San Francisco!”