Students

  • Week 1 - Access via Infrastructure

    Week 1 - Access via Infrastructure

    The first week of the program introduced us to the river and region of Los Angeles. My regional analysis of transportation systems was influenced by readings and frequent field trips to various stretches of the river. I became interested in how we perceive the river and how our perceptions might change depending on where we stand.
    I selected stretches of the river with no pedestrian crossings for at least a quarter mile as the most opportunistic sites for intervention, especially if they coincided with the ecologically rich soft bottom channel sections.
    The first week of the program introduced us to the river and region of Los Angeles. My regional analysis of transportation systems was influenced by readings and frequent field trips to various stretches of the river. I became interested in how we perceive the river and how our perceptions might change depending on where we stand.
    I selected stretches of the river with no pedestrian crossings for at least a quarter mile as the most opportunistic sites for intervention, especially if they coincided with the ecologically rich soft bottom channel sections.

  • Week 2 - The Landscape Project Part I

    Week 2 - The Landscape Project Part I

    The site that I selected is a long crescent shaped rail yard on the east bank of the river, where Metrolink trains are stored and serviced. It fell within one of the opportunistic stretches that I had identified in the first week: there were no pedestrian crossings within a quarter mile of the site and the channel had a soft bottom. The site effectively blocks access to the river by residents of the Cypress Hill neighborhood to the east.
    When I discovered that the city and have plans to build a new pedestrian bridge at the northern end of my site, I asked: Can that bridge do more than link one side of the channel to the other?
    The site that I selected is a long crescent shaped rail yard on the east bank of the river, where Metrolink trains are stored and serviced. It fell within one of the opportunistic stretches that I had identified in the first week: there were no pedestrian crossings within a quarter mile of the site and the channel had a soft bottom. The site effectively blocks access to the river by residents of the Cypress Hill neighborhood to the east.
    When I discovered that the city and have plans to build a new pedestrian bridge at the northern end of my site, I asked: Can that bridge do more than link one side of the channel to the other?

  • Week 3 - The Landscape Project Part II

    Week 3 - The Landscape Project Part II

    I read that further development of the bird communities on the river is hampered by a lack of upland habitat. I proposed the creation of wedges that replicate the pre-channelizedriverbanks transition to upland habitat. The wedges could be turned lengthwise and inserted along the east bank of the river. About twenty five feet wide, but hundreds of feet long and varying in height between fifty and eighty feet above the river bottom, I envisioned a robust concrete form that replicates the existing materiality and geometry of the channel.
    I read that further development of the bird communities on the river is hampered by a lack of upland habitat. I proposed the creation of wedges that replicate the pre-channelized
    riverbanks transition to upland habitat. The wedges could be turned lengthwise and inserted along the east bank of the river. About twenty five feet wide, but hundreds of feet long and varying in height between fifty and eighty feet above the river bottom, I envisioned a robust concrete form that replicates the existing materiality and geometry of the channel.

  • Week 4 - Ecological Infrastructure

    Week 4 - Ecological Infrastructure

    I came to consider how the character of the east and west banks might differ. The west bank abuts the neighborhood of Elysian Valley, but it does not welcome people to the river. I proposed altering the west bank to include stairways and terraces that accessing the river easier. The west bank can thus be considered the “people’s bank.” The east bank, on the other hand, is almost cut off from Cypress Park by the Metrolink site. I decided that access to this bank, which includes the wedge habitats, should remain limited. The available pathways that I proposed to run alongside the wedges would therefore likely be used by only those who truly wish
    I came to consider how the character of the east and west banks might differ. The west bank abuts the neighborhood of Elysian Valley, but it does not welcome people to the river. I proposed altering the west bank to include stairways and terraces that accessing the river easier. The west bank can thus be considered the “people’s bank.” The east bank, on the other hand, is almost cut off from Cypress Park by the Metrolink site. I decided that access to this bank, which includes the wedge habitats, should remain limited. The available pathways that I proposed to run alongside the wedges would therefore likely be used by only those who truly wish

Ian Mackay

160c8eb3_screenshot2013-10-08at5.28.18pm_114x114

I grew up in Cleveland, Ohio and studied English Literature for my undergraduate degree. I moved to Washington, DC, where I worked for several years as a paralegal in the US Justice Department. I spent a good deal of that time reading and drawing—and discovered the field of landscape architecture. I decided to pursue my interests back in the Midwest at Ohio State University, where I’ve just completed the second year of a dual degree in Landscape Architecture and City Planning. I am excited to live in Los Angeles and study it as an infrastructural city. I also look forward to meeting and working with a new group of people.