Students

  • WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.
    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.

  • WEEK 2: URBAN DESIGN -

    WEEK 2: URBAN DESIGN -

    Initial explorations of the site left Gwen enamored by the streetscape South of Market; in particular by the contrast between streets and alleys. Interested in the layers of natural and cultural histories, she considered ways to emphasize existing elements that make it distinct within San Francisco. South of Market currently hosts a diverse ecosystem of tech companies. This culture of various scales of technological innovation is expressed visually in the culture of makers. By embracing independent fabrication, maker communities constantly tinker with ways to improve the efficiency and beauty of their surroundings.
    Initial explorations of the site left Gwen enamored by the streetscape South of Market; in particular by the contrast between streets and alleys. Interested in the layers of natural and cultural histories, she considered ways to emphasize existing elements that make it distinct within San Francisco. South of Market currently hosts a diverse ecosystem of tech companies. This culture of various scales of technological innovation is expressed visually in the culture of makers. By embracing independent fabrication, maker communities constantly tinker with ways to improve the efficiency and beauty of their surroundings.

  • SOMA ALLEYSCAPES

    SOMA ALLEYSCAPES

    During the third week, Gwen concentrated on a block and a half bounded by Bryant, Bluxome, Fifth, and Fourth. Gwen decided to consider existing conditions, and what form future development could take. Vertical efficiency could be considered, as well as ways to activate the streetscapes that surround these distribution sites.As the makerspaces are one typology of place, they could be defined by programing the ground floor of northeast to southwest streets with light industry, galleries, and related retail.
    During the third week, Gwen concentrated on a block and a half bounded by Bryant, Bluxome, Fifth, and Fourth.
    Gwen decided to consider existing conditions, and what form future development could take. Vertical efficiency could be considered, as well as ways to activate the streetscapes that surround these distribution sites.
    As the makerspaces are one typology of place, they could be defined by programing the ground floor of northeast to southwest streets with light industry, galleries, and related retail

  • WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - EMBRACING SENSE OF PLACE

    WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - EMBRACING SENSE OF PLACE

    Creating something from salvaged materials provided the perfect conclusion to Gwen’s explorations into the cultures of small-scale fabrication and tinkering. To engage the community in making their district one of constant experimentation in sustainable technology, finding alternate purposes for scrap materials would be central to the identity of the district.
    Creating something from salvaged materials provided the perfect conclusion to Gwen’s explorations into the cultures of small-scale fabrication and tinkering. To engage the community in making their district one of constant experimentation in sustainable technology, finding alternate purposes for scrap materials would be central to the identity of the district.

Gwendolyn McGinn

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“As a student at the University of Virginia, I have developed an interest in incorporating infrastructure as a part of the everyday design aesthetic. There has been a tendency to assume that our world is stable, but as coasts shift and temperatures change, it becomes important to acknowledge that our world is in a constant state of fluctuation. By exposing the infrastructure that our cities and town rely on, the extent of our built environment becomes a part of our everyday realities.
As a landscape architect, I would like to create environments that feed insects but also provide joy to the people within them. I am interested in finding aesthetically appealing solutions to remediate polluted sites. Landscape architecture provides an exciting method of reengaging spaces while correcting past ecological mistakes. From an infrastructural and conceptual scale, I am fascinated by returning to the smaller scale and responding to microclimates and material palettes to provide a sense of place and identity.”