Students

  • WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    WEEK 1: REGIONAL CONTEXT

    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.
    The first week of the Summer Program focused on inventory, analysis, and initial visioning for the Central Corridor. Working as pairs, the students examined the area’s natural and man-made systems to understand the dynamic forces that shape the Central Corridor and surrounding areas. Building off of the city’s planning department analysis, students studied systems including historic, cultural, transportation, infrastructure, public space typologies, urban grid, building massing, street typologies, and projected design potentials based on the findings.

  • WEEK 02 : URBAN DESIGN

    WEEK 02 : URBAN DESIGN

    The geology and the soil quality of the Central Corridor are two related challenges that can help generate urban forms. First, being constructed mostly on artificial fill over a former salt marsh, the site is extremely prone to liquefaction during earthquakes. Secondly, the site has a history of groundwater contamination from leaking underground storage tanks, which for decades has polluted the soil with hydrocarbons such as diesel and gasoline.
    The geology and the soil quality of the Central Corridor are two related challenges that can help generate urban forms.
    First, being constructed mostly on artificial fill over a former salt marsh, the site is extremely prone to liquefaction during earthquakes. Secondly, the site has a history of groundwater contamination from leaking underground storage tanks, which for decades has polluted the soil with hydrocarbons such as diesel and gasoline.

  • WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - REMEDI-ALLEYS

    WEEK 03 : SITE DESIGN - REMEDI-ALLEYS

    Using the existing network of alleyways as a base, and interpolating potential extensions, a network of green “remedi-alleys” are designed within the district. These respond to the existing conditions of the groundwater flow and contaminated sites as a way of strategically remediating the site while also creating new culturally valuable spaces.
    Using the existing network of alleyways as a base, and interpolating potential extensions, a network of green “remedi-alleys” are designed within the district. These respond to the existing conditions of the groundwater flow and contaminated sites as a way of strategically remediating the site while also creating new culturally valuable spaces.

  • WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - MYCOLOGICAL SURFACE

    WEEK 04 : OBJECT DESIGN - MYCOLOGICAL SURFACE

    Using cardboard tubes as a structural and form-giving material, a mycological surface was designed to remediate contaminated soil on the site and also create productive and artistic installations. Contaminated soil would fill the cardboard tubes, and mushroom spawn would then be inoculated in the soil. As the mushrooms grow and the mycelium clean the soil, the overall structure would steadily decompose. Eventually, reusable soil would be made and distributed for use across the district.
    Using cardboard tubes as a structural and form-giving material, a mycological surface was designed to remediate contaminated soil on the site and also create productive and artistic installations. Contaminated soil would fill the cardboard tubes, and mushroom spawn would then be inoculated in the soil. As the mushrooms grow and the mycelium clean the soil, the overall structure would steadily decompose. Eventually, reusable soil would be made and distributed for use across the district.

Frank Hu

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“In short, I never expected to be where I am today, when most of my life I had dreams of being a cartoonist. Born in Twinsburg, Ohio, I grew up with a love for art and drawing.

For my A.P. Art concentration, I drew a series

of illustrations showing how dinosaurs would destroy society if they existed today. In a last minute decision, I applied to Washington University in St. Louis and got accepted into their art program. At some point before starting, I made the switch from art to architecture, seeing that art and architecture were more interconnected than one might think. I was seeing that design was not a skill, but a tool and a way of thinking. I decided to make a leap to landscape architecture due to the scale and complexity of the field. At Harvard, I have most enjoyed learning about ecology, plants, and aquifers — things I knew very little about before. In my spare time, I still draw cartoons.”