Students

  • Week 2 - The Landscape Project Part I

    Week 2 - The Landscape Project Part I

    Investigating the history of Los Angeles and relationship to geomorphology is a very interesting and important tool for revealing the LA River and the city’s identity. This hydrological connection: river, floodplain and hills, is a key perspective in finding a solution. Bringing back the historical function of the floodplain as a water infiltration will address issues such as water quality and supply.
    Investigating the history of Los Angeles and relationship to geomorphology is a very interesting and important tool for revealing the LA River and the city’s identity. This hydrological connection: river, floodplain and hills, is a key perspective in finding a solution. Bringing back the historical function of the floodplain as a water infiltration will address issues such as water quality and supply.

  • Week 3 - The Landscape Project Part II

    Week 3 - The Landscape Project Part II

    The area has a lot of potential for the geomorfological connection. William mead housing is a public housing area surrounded by industry. The River is hidden behind fencesand walls en there are a lot of obstructions by freeways and railways that interrupt the geomorfological connection. It is an opportunity to redevelop not only William Mead Housing, but also involve DWP Main Street Yard. The whole area between the Los Angeles Historical State Park and the LA River will become one neighborhood.
    The area has a lot of potential for the geomorfological connection. William mead housing is a public housing area surrounded by industry. The River is hidden behind fences
    and walls en there are a lot of obstructions by freeways and railways that interrupt the geomorfological connection. It is an opportunity to redevelop not only William Mead Housing, but also involve DWP Main Street Yard. The whole area between the Los Angeles Historical State Park and the LA River will become one neighborhood.

  • Week 4 - Let the Show Begin

    Week 4 - Let the Show Begin

    Amphibious houses are a modern way to deal with climate change in the Netherlands. The water level rises, so we have to adapt to this new situation. These houses are built in a lake that has a direct connection with the river Maas. This housing type has a concrete float founded on piles in the ground. In a situation with a frequent water level, the house rest on this foundation. When the water level rises the house will float and move along a guiding pile, so it stays in place. These houses are, in a safe way, adapt to variable water levels.
    Amphibious houses are a modern way to deal with climate change in the Netherlands. The water level rises, so we have to adapt to this new situation. These houses are built in a lake that has a direct connection with the river Maas. This housing type has a concrete float founded on piles in the ground. In a situation with a frequent water level, the house rest on this foundation. When the water level rises the house will float and move along a guiding pile, so it stays in place. These houses are, in a safe way, adapt to variable water levels

Esther Korteweg

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I am earning my Bachelor of Landscape Architecture at the Van Hall Larenstein in the Netherlands. I create realistic designs with a sense of magic. I want to solve problematic cases of complex areas in which topics with climate change, water safety, urbanization, ecological processes, agriculture and sustainable resources come together. I enjoy making graphics so that projects look beautiful and are easily understood by the public. I like to inspire people with these artistic impressions.

A goal and focus within my designs is to redevelop slums and degraded communities in order to improve the lives of its residents. As the urban population doubles over the next three decades, the question as to how cities function will need to be better managed. The challenge is to provide alternatives that can enhance the environment in these often neglected areas.

2013 Summmer Program Info